AWD Conservancy Newsletter
Three Brothers
Together We Can Make A Difference

African wild dogs face the threat of extinction because of human persecution and habitat loss. With your support, the AWD Conservancy is working to find ways to help save one of the world's most endangered canids.

Thank you so much for supporting our efforts on behalf of this truly remarkable species. We know this is the time of year when there is a flurry of requests for donations so we will keep this short. We kindly ask for your continued support to keep our work on track.

Biodiversity Hotspots
Study Area
Study area
Thank You For Your Support!
Yearlings

In large part, because of your support, the Conservancy surveyed some 3600 people living in villages scattered over more than 80,000 square kilometers, and confirmed a new population of wild dogs previously unknown to the scientific commmunity. This area provides critical linkages with populations in the Meru National Park complex, Boni and Dodori National Reserves, and Tsavo National Park, and based on anecdotal reports, wild dogs in Somalia. Reports from villagers indicate that wild dogs account for only about 4% of overall livestock losses to predators, approximately half of those losses occurring in one area.

Our conclusion: given the limited availability of water for human settlement, relatively low density of people, and that the dominate ethnic group living in much of the core area does not hunt game (wild dog prey species), this region is a potential long-term stronghold for this endangered canid. And now there is new information to update the East African Regional Wild Dog Conservation Plan. This could not have been done without your generosity.

in addition to our work in East Africa, we are also pleased to report that plans are underway to launch a project in southern Africa not too far from our old Zimbabwe stomping grounds where we lived for nine years conducting a wild dog conservation project. We'll keep you posted to let you know how things unfold!

Expanding Our Educational Initiative — Wildlife Clubs

Following our teacher training workshop and the hard work of our local Director of Education, increased community awareness of wild dogs and the environment resulted in primary schools asking the Conservancy's help in forming student wildlife clubs. These children hunger to learn more and want to do projects that will help stop environmental degradation. Please help us keep the seeds of conservation growing.

Schoolgirl with wild dog pup photo
Students campaigning for wildlife clubs
We need your help to keep our work moving forward. Your donation of any amount is important. If you can't make a contribution, help spread the word about our work through Facebook, Twitter, and MySpace.
Facebook
Twitter
Myspace
Courtesy of the Chicago Zoological Society
Please consider supporting the AWD Conservancy in its efforts to save one of the world’s most endangered carnivores. Whether a gift in the name of someone you care about or for yourself, your support really can make a difference. Donations can be made through PayPal at the Make a Donation link.
Thank you!
About the AWD Conservancy
Boni Forest

Started in 2001, the African Wild Dog Conservancy is dedicated to working with local communities, and national and international stakeholders to conserve wild dogs through scientific research and education.